Sunday, December 7, 2014

Why Art Education is Important

Do you have a budding artist in the family? Does your son or daughter love to draw or paint? Does he constantly pester you for coloring books or art materials? If so, do encourage that person to continue what he or she is doing. Those meaningless scribbles might be the start of a bright future. Your kid might not become another van Gogh or Dali but he will surely benefit from a good art education.


Unknown to many, a strong art education is important since it helps children develop skills that they need to be successful in life. Among the many benefits of art education are self-directed learning, improved school attendance and better creative skills. Recent studies have shown that the creativity and innovation used in the artistic process are highly valued by employers.

Creative arts programs play a big role in shaping students' self-image and increasing their skills in math, science, geography and language. Early exposure to visual art, music or drama is known to promote brain activity. It encourages learning and helps people understand other subjects easily. Art also promotes creativity and inventiveness and helps develop self-esteem, self-discipline and self-motivation.

But that’s not all. Art activities help kids understand the human experience. It teaches them to respect other people’s' ways of working and thinking, helps develop creative problem-solving skills, and enables them to communicate their thoughts and ideas in many ways. Unfortunately, the hard times have affected the way people see art. Often, art programs are the first to be sacrificed in implementing cost-cutting measures. Several schools have limited classroom space and art "studios" are mostly found in a cart that is transferred from room to room. This greatly limits the art education that students receive.



How do we solve this problem? Start by encouraging kids to draw. All you need is a pencil and a piece of paper yet this simple process provides the basis for other creative activities such as painting and sculpture. Drawing is a direct link to reading, writing and math. This is the most accessible art form available that will go a long way in making your child a better person someday.

11 comments:

  1. I do that -- encourage my kids to draw! Luckily they have elective animation classes in school :D

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  2. This is so true. Thanks for sharing!

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  3. I truly believe in the importance of art. My kids love arts and crafts activities. My second daughter loves to draw and is always sketching something.

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  4. My son at 3 loves scribbling, doodling, coloring and painting that's why we have several sets of colorful pens, whiteboard markers, watercolors and stamps!

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  5. I really invest in different art materials because my son loves to draw and paint but not coloring.

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  6. My younger son has the inclination to the arts and he loves to draw, color. The thing is he doesn't want to enrol in formal classes. Hay!

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  7. Doing arts and crafts is very relaxing. I will definitely enroll my son next summer.

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  8. So true! I myself was an artistically inclined child, and I think that was the thing that encouraged me to write literature at an early age.

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  9. All my kids' first "lessons" before they started formal school were art-based. Math, Reading, Science concepts were integrated in art activities. It made learning so much more fun.

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  10. I have to agree with you Mommy. I enrolled my eldest daughter in art classes in Gymboree when she was 2 and I was surprised with how much she loved it. She enjoyed painting and drawing so I decided to buy her art materials, which she also love. Sadly, she also painted on our white walls :))

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  11. True! My daughter really loves coloring and drawing even though it just looks like scribbles for now. hehe

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